MA Creative Writing student at UP Diliman from the Land of Buko Pies.

Also a runner, photographer, cyclist, florist, dreamer, and believer.

Earlier at lunch, she had dropped her fork. It was classic of her to do things like this. She was clumsy; not as refined as she would want to be. No matter what she did, she’d always end up a little short on being ideal. She put her head down, her sight to the floor and scanned. When she saw where the fork went, she slowly bent down, but he was already onto it.
He touched the fork first, but with her gained momentum, she couldn’t stop so her hand hit his. They both smiled at this as they slowly sat again. She placed the fork at the far corner of the table. He requested the waiter to hand another fork. Deep inside, she was flying because whenever she was with him, she didn’t feel lacking in anything, she didn’t feel clumsy and more than anything, she delighted in the feeling that she was somehow adequate.
They walked in the park with full stomachs and whiled the time away in the warm afternoon breeze. They talked mostly. They sat on the cool grass and under the dancing leaves of a mahogany tree, she shared her personal thoughts and musings—childhood experiences, adolescent adventures, and adulthood fears. He listened intently and not for a moment did he seem disinterested. She always thought of herself as boring, but with every word she spoke, that thought faded.
She rested her head on his lap as she gazed up, scanning the leaves with the sun constantly peeking, twinkling. When the bright ray hit her eyes she closed them and at that moment, she knew that being near him was everything she wanted. Being with him was as easy as breathing, as natural as a heartbeat.
The hours seemed to fly. The sun had weakened and the crowd in the park thinned. It was already sunset when they started walking to the terminal station. He was holding her hand as she faced him. He kissed her on the left cheek and let go.
And then there was the deafening silence because no words could be uttered to fully reconcile the deep sadness both were feeling at that moment. She walked onto the train unwilling to leave, unable to stay. Trying to grapple with the question, why do hearts which belonged to each other have to be far apart?

Earlier at lunch, she had dropped her fork. It was classic of her to do things like this. She was clumsy; not as refined as she would want to be. No matter what she did, she’d always end up a little short on being ideal. She put her head down, her sight to the floor and scanned. When she saw where the fork went, she slowly bent down, but he was already onto it.

He touched the fork first, but with her gained momentum, she couldn’t stop so her hand hit his. They both smiled at this as they slowly sat again. She placed the fork at the far corner of the table. He requested the waiter to hand another fork. Deep inside, she was flying because whenever she was with him, she didn’t feel lacking in anything, she didn’t feel clumsy and more than anything, she delighted in the feeling that she was somehow adequate.

They walked in the park with full stomachs and whiled the time away in the warm afternoon breeze. They talked mostly. They sat on the cool grass and under the dancing leaves of a mahogany tree, she shared her personal thoughts and musings—childhood experiences, adolescent adventures, and adulthood fears. He listened intently and not for a moment did he seem disinterested. She always thought of herself as boring, but with every word she spoke, that thought faded.

She rested her head on his lap as she gazed up, scanning the leaves with the sun constantly peeking, twinkling. When the bright ray hit her eyes she closed them and at that moment, she knew that being near him was everything she wanted. Being with him was as easy as breathing, as natural as a heartbeat.

The hours seemed to fly. The sun had weakened and the crowd in the park thinned. It was already sunset when they started walking to the terminal station. He was holding her hand as she faced him. He kissed her on the left cheek and let go.

And then there was the deafening silence because no words could be uttered to fully reconcile the deep sadness both were feeling at that moment. She walked onto the train unwilling to leave, unable to stay. Trying to grapple with the question, why do hearts which belonged to each other have to be far apart?