MA Creative Writing student at UP Diliman from the Land of Buko Pies.

Also a runner, photographer, cyclist, florist, dreamer, and believer.

I’ve been struggling for years with my attachment with bags. If my memory serves me right, the very first bag that I owned was a blue Ghost Busters messenger bag. According to stories it was the same bag that I used during my first attempt to run away from home. I was 4 years old. I wasn’t thinking rationally, I mean I was 4 and clearly, I didn’t know better—that bag was too small for all my necessities!
Almost 2 decades after that, I still find myself engrossed in messenger bags. At one point in my life, I’ve learned to be materialistic and brand-conscious, something which I attribute to my being enrolled at a school for rich kids. Looking back at it now, it’s something that I don’t pride myself for. It’s something I’d rather my friends forget about me. But then, maybe life is really just like this: In time, we learn that there are things far more important than labels, brands, and material goods. Even though throughout my college years, I’ve known this truth, it was still hard to let go. Now, that I am working, I realize that there is so much more to life than riches or possessions. One cannot simply get what he/she wants, sometimes he/she has to work for it. And I’m lucky to have been born to parents that are hard-working. Life is a challenge, and there are those who are especially challenged. Isn’t it my motto to do something worthwhile? I’ve learned that my longing to keep these material possessions that I value has kept me from helping others—those who are in need.
Please understand that it is with no miniscule amount of courage and forbearance that of the 19 bags I have acquired, I have decided to give away 8 to children who need them more than I do. These children would be students from underprivileged families.
This decision springs forth from the realization I had while driving home months ago: I realized that the worth of these bags would be more realized if they were used by children in going to school as vessels of notebooks, textbooks, pencils and other school supplies as opposed to being just displayed here in my room. The remaining 11 are not all messenger bags, and all of them, as I have deliberated, I still use regularly. This decision has brought me to tears. You have to understand that these bags are my prized possessions, all of them have histories (sentimental value) and they’re not really cheap (I wasn’t born to a rich family, so even though these aren’t at par with Vuittons and Guccis, they’re very much valuable for me).
This idea has been simmering in my head for more than 3 months. Now that the year is almost over, I can’t procrastinate anymore. Today is exactly a month before my birthday, too so it’s kind of symbolic. I will be posting my progress here and a brief profile of the recipients of the 8 bags as well as my thoughts in this challenging endeavour.
I am not publicizing this so that all of my readers would think of me as a do-gooder.
I only aim to inspire anybody, especially those who feel like they have an attachment that prevents them from doing something worthwhile. You must learn to let them go. Look beyond the sacrifice and think of the greater good that’s going to come out of it.
This is me trying to do something worthwhile.

I’ve been struggling for years with my attachment with bags. If my memory serves me right, the very first bag that I owned was a blue Ghost Busters messenger bag. According to stories it was the same bag that I used during my first attempt to run away from home. I was 4 years old. I wasn’t thinking rationally, I mean I was 4 and clearly, I didn’t know better—that bag was too small for all my necessities!

Almost 2 decades after that, I still find myself engrossed in messenger bags. At one point in my life, I’ve learned to be materialistic and brand-conscious, something which I attribute to my being enrolled at a school for rich kids. Looking back at it now, it’s something that I don’t pride myself for. It’s something I’d rather my friends forget about me. But then, maybe life is really just like this: In time, we learn that there are things far more important than labels, brands, and material goods. Even though throughout my college years, I’ve known this truth, it was still hard to let go. Now, that I am working, I realize that there is so much more to life than riches or possessions. One cannot simply get what he/she wants, sometimes he/she has to work for it. And I’m lucky to have been born to parents that are hard-working. Life is a challenge, and there are those who are especially challenged. Isn’t it my motto to do something worthwhile? I’ve learned that my longing to keep these material possessions that I value has kept me from helping others—those who are in need.

Please understand that it is with no miniscule amount of courage and forbearance that of the 19 bags I have acquired, I have decided to give away 8 to children who need them more than I do. These children would be students from underprivileged families.

This decision springs forth from the realization I had while driving home months ago: I realized that the worth of these bags would be more realized if they were used by children in going to school as vessels of notebooks, textbooks, pencils and other school supplies as opposed to being just displayed here in my room. The remaining 11 are not all messenger bags, and all of them, as I have deliberated, I still use regularly. This decision has brought me to tears. You have to understand that these bags are my prized possessions, all of them have histories (sentimental value) and they’re not really cheap (I wasn’t born to a rich family, so even though these aren’t at par with Vuittons and Guccis, they’re very much valuable for me).

This idea has been simmering in my head for more than 3 months. Now that the year is almost over, I can’t procrastinate anymore. Today is exactly a month before my birthday, too so it’s kind of symbolic. I will be posting my progress here and a brief profile of the recipients of the 8 bags as well as my thoughts in this challenging endeavour.

I am not publicizing this so that all of my readers would think of me as a do-gooder.

I only aim to inspire anybody, especially those who feel like they have an attachment that prevents them from doing something worthwhile. You must learn to let them go. Look beyond the sacrifice and think of the greater good that’s going to come out of it.

This is me trying to do something worthwhile.